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eMEDICS.org is pleased to announce several improvements to its CoreERP software

CoreERP, eMEDICS.org’s software solution has been successfully adapted to the Swiss Home Care system.

For more than a year now, eMEDICS.org, specialist in mobile and web health applications, has provided added value software to its clients. By joining forces, our ambition is to provide quality products and meet Swiss health sector demands both in terms of business specifications and technological realization.

After receiving numerous recommendations from GE / VD physicians, as well as several Swiss organizations such as SwissAgisan and MyPrivateCare, we have incorporated several improvements to CoreERP, in order to offer a more complete and turnkey solution to all Swiss Home Care organizations.

Medical forms managed by these associations such as the patient records, medical RAI and household assessments, the exit form are already supported by CoreERP but we went further…

A) What’s new?

A.1. Diversified Cloud Solutions

We tested our CoreERP solution on several infrastructures including DigitalOcean, AWS, Azure, InfoManiak and Exoscale. Deployment remains generic and simple. We are currently discussing a possible offer of CoreERP with Swisscom, as part of their SaaS (Solution As A Service) portfolio. There are also several possible synergies between Evita, the SwissCom solution for medical organizations and CoreERP with the upcoming launch of a Health Care Network (data sharing between patients and doctors).

A.2. More advanced process automation

Business processes in the health field are complex. Automation is key for time saving and cost reduction. CoreERP offers a unique automated solution. Here are some of the improvements:

A.2.1. Implementation of a summary table

A summary table of patient records is now available for the web and mobile version. It does contain the most important fields such as vital parameters (weight, respiratory rate, body temperature, blood pressure, pulse rate, etc.), RAI alarms, performance scales, observations and / or tasks related to this patient. This table is very useful for health field workers who need quick access to important data.

A.2.2. Form Automation

◦ When a medical claim is completed, RAI and household assessments are now automatically generated. They’re no longer created manually

◦ For RAI evaluations, the active instance is synchronized automatically between the mobile app and the back-end. When the field worker completes the evaluation, CoreERP then generates the “action plan”, the RAI alarms and the performance scales (AVQ, IAVQ, CPS et DRS).

◦ The renewal of RAI assessments and the OPAS management are also automated.

◦ When the medical claim is created, the associated exit form is also created in order to handle end-to-end tracability.

◦ When the exit form is completed, all associated forms (medical claims, patient forms, evaluations…) are automatically archived. If a conflict occurs, CoreERP identifies the issues and raise corrective actions to the administrator. The DMST (canton de VD) is also generated automatically.

A.3. Automatic Document Generation and EDM (Electronic Document Management)

◦ Working documents can be generated automatically saving valuable time to administrators and avoiding data entry mistakes. For example, the DMST V2.1 (Medico-social transmission document) which is a standardized document used in the canton de VD when transferring a patient from one healthcare provider to another, contains useful information to ensure continuity in patient care. These include administrative information, a contact list (Caregivers, family and relatives), health checks and data transfer. The DMST was developed within the framework of the cantonal programs in order to improve patient quality follow-up among partners (eHealth). CoreERP generates this document and track its status for a better follow-up during the transfers.
◦ CoreERP has an incorporated EDM system that could easily integrate with existing systems such as SAP, Documentum and SharePoint (Office365).

A.4. Improved ergonomy and analysis tools

◦ The Offline solution has been improved. The field collaborator no longer needs to intervene for data synchronization between field workers and the admin center.  Note that if the internet connection is available, the collaborator has the possibility to initiate a synchronization by hand, in order to refresh the data in real time. But this is an optional operation and is not mandatory.

 


◦ Color code: For RAI evaluation, for example, a color code has been added to identify the progress of each section. This is very useful if the evaluation is performed during multiple visits. By knowing the status of the section, productivity is greatly improved. The color codes are as follow:

▪ Red to indicate that the section was not started.
▪ Blue to indicate that the section has been started.
▪ Green to indicate that the section has been completed.


◦ Several KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) are now available in the turnkey solution such as patient evolution history, statistics related to the number of RAI assessments to be processed, the number of billing mandates to be processed, various indicators such as LAMAL / NON-LAMAL acts…

B. Additional functionalities will be available by Q2 2018:

B.1. Multilingual

◦ The multilingual module will be available in French, Italian, German and English.

B.2. Automated action plan

◦ Although there are no QSYS and InterRAI specifications regarding action plan automation, we should be able to push the automation to a higher level. Our algorithm will link generated RAI alarms to OPAS and RAI HC, ASSASD acts. An action plan will then be generated proposing recommended acts and frequencies. The staff will then evaluate the plan and make any correction to it. Based on staff’s changes, the algorithm will adapt and propose new action plan for similar patients. The machine will never replace human and medical expertise but our solution will help improve analysis and validate action plans faster.

B.3. OPAS approval process

◦ The OPAL follow-up and renewal process already exist. CoreERP goes further… The approval OPAS process will be fully automated by the use of workflows and electronic certified signatures of the attending physician, the insurance and the home care organization. That would simplify the OPAS traceability and improve productivity for all parties.

B.4. Implementation of automated activity reports and time sheets

◦ CoreERP now manages a manual activity report for employees. In the near future, CoreERP will be able to generate automated ones based on the action plan acts and next, the billing statements.

B.5. Software enhancements

◦ CoreERP is using the most advanced open source technologies such as NodeJS, Bootstrap, Angular2, IONIC1 and CouchDB. The ultra-fast Google V8 engine allows to decouple application requests and offline synchronization, thus eliminating any latency and improving the user experience. Field staff can focus on their business activities and not worry about the mobile interface. We plan migrate the CoreERP mobile application to IONIC2 in the coming months to further improve this user experience.

B.6. Automated planning

◦ With the advanced Geo-localization tools, we will be able to create visits and optimize field staff journeys (and thus reduce the cost and duration of field staff journeys).

B.7. eMEDICS.org Health Care Network (EHC Network)

◦ CoreERP is a platform that will be opened to all physicians, clinics, pharmacies, Home care organizations, hospitals, insurance companies  (with the preservation of medical data of patients), and patients themselves, facilitating the exchange of medical information. A catalog of forms will be available to medical organizations, which will allow them to set better diagnosis and share data with the patients (patients could also provide health measurements over time).

Si vous désirez plus d’information, vous pouvez nous contacter à l’adresse mail admin@emedics.org ou nous appeler au +41 75 416 4140.

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An EHR optimization that actually wins over physicians?

EHR optimization – Baystate Health takes aim at click fatigue with mobile-optimized workflow tool.

Like all healthcare CIOs, Joel Vengco, chief information officer at Springfield, Massachusetts-based Baystate Health, has no shortage of pressing projects competing for his attention for EHR optimization.

Whether it’s working to drive operational efficiencies across the $2.5 billion health system, improving the usability of an array of applications for clinical end users, spearheading community engagement and patient outreach for population health management or working on analytics and “knowledge management,” it all make for a busy workday.

That’s all in addition to the imperative of constant innovation: Beyond just being Baystate’s CIO, Vengco is the founder of TechSpring, an innovation center based at the health system where IT vendors are given secure access to real patient data to speed the development of new technologies.

“So there are lots of things to focus on as a CIO – notwithstanding all the security issues we’ve got to focus on too,” he said.

But even with so much going across Baystate – five hospitals, an academic medical center, 90 medical groups, a health plan with about 250,000 members, “a Next Gen ACO that we manage, and we’re getting into a Medicaid ACO” – Vengco has generally felt pretty on top of things.

Except, until recently, with one important initiative.

“The big project we’ve still yet to quite crack the nut on is: How do you optimize the EHR? How do you optimize the workflow for a clinician?” he said.

Work for providers, on a day-to-day basis, just gets more burdensome, said Vengco. “They’ve got to document, they’ve got to bill – and then they have to see the patient at some point. And then that 15-minute visit becomes a 20- or 30-minute visit because you’re doing all this other work.”

So Vengco posed a tall task to his IT team: Optimize the electronic health record and improve workflow for Baystate’s clinicians. But do it, crucially, in a way where the clinicians take to the new approach voluntarily, because it works better for them, rather than having to be told to do so.

“That was the challenge,” he said. “To leverage our current legacy EHR, Cerner, but then really enhance it without ripping and replacing it.”

For help, he turned to Palo Alto, California-based Praxify, whose recently unveiled MIRA app can augment existing EHRs, integrating with legacy systems to improve workflow.

Touted as being designed by and for physicians, the app offers capabilities such as “glanceable” interfaces that can surface key patient data for faster documentation and review, and dictation tools that enable voice-activated order entry.

The app gives clinicians the “data and the functionality they need within one or two touches or clicks,” said Vengco. “In our case, it’s more of a mobile design, using the heuristics of swiping and all the mobile capabilities you’re using in your day to day life.”

To Praxify, he also had some clear instructions: “We can’t spend two years doing this, we can’t spend millions of dollars putting you guys on top of Cerner. That doesn’t create value. What creates value is doing it in three to five months and actually getting adoption by the providers without me mandating use,” said Vengco.

“That challenge, happy to say, has been met,” he said.

Praxify connects with Cerner, using APIs, in just two or three months, he said. “Now we’re going full force with a production deployment to our health system. And some of the preliminary feedback is that providers, who are some of the hardest customers, are saying they definitely want to use this,” he said.

“We had a hospitalist, probably one of the most vocal critics of our EHR, initially said she wasn’t going to use Praxify,” said Vengco. “She said it was just another technology burden.”

Not long after trying it, she returned to the CIO with glowing reviews. “She said, ‘This is amazing. It’s incredible.'”

Across Baystate, “we’ve seen efficiencies of, on average, 40 percent if you compare it to the way the EHR was previously being used,” said Vengco. “They love the fact that they can get it on any mobile device. They love that, instead of taking five or seven or 10 clicks, it’s a swipe, or a touch. It’s efficient and fast. They love the design of it. They love that they can dictate.”

Because it connects directly to the EHR, there’s no concern about a loss of data. “And the design is intuitive enough that we don’t have to do five or seven hours of training  – it’s a 20-minute discussion and they’re off and running,” he said.

The point, said Vengo, is that “I want them to adopt it themselves. If I give it to them and it goes viral, and they take to it, that means it’s intuitive, it’s optimized, and that makes me happy because the providers are happy.”

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google harvard symptom patient monitoring

Monitoring Device Market Worth US$ 1,502.9 Mn by 2024

Global remote patient monitoring device market is expected to expand at a CAGR of 6.7% and is estimated to reach US$ 1,502.9 Mn by 2024, creating incremental opportunity of US$ 657.1 Mn between 2016 and 2024. Persistence Market Research analyzes the overall performance of the global remote patient monitoring device market and provides key insights on the factors and trends likely to influence the market during this eight-year period.

Rising prevalence of cardio vascular diseases, respiratory disorders, and diabetes in the general population are major factors driving the growth of the global remote patient monitoring device market. Increasing healthcare expenditure and increasing availability of effective treatment solutions for chronic diseases is also projected to boost revenue growth of the global remote patient monitoring device market. Other factors boosting market growth include an increasing awareness among people to self-monitor before disease advancement and government reimbursement issued on homecare settings facilities.

Lack of trained professionals to help with remote patient monitoring devices is expected to hinder market growth of the global remote patient monitoring device market. Insufficiency in maintaining the privacy and security of the stored data, lack of uniformity in device functionality, and lack of general awareness on patient monitoring devices are the key restraints challenging the market.

Global remote patient monitoring device market is segmented on the basis of Product Type (Cardiac Monitors, Respiratory Monitors, Hematological Monitors), Application (Cardiac Arrhythmia, Diabetes, Ischemic diseases, Hypertension, Sleep apnea, Chronic respiratory diseases, Hyperlipidemia), End User (Hospitals, Homecare Settings, Long-term Care Centers, Others), and Region (North America, Latin America, Europe, APEJ, and MEA).

By product type, the cardiac monitors segment is expected to remain the largest segment and is anticipated to reach US$ 765.4 Mn by the end of 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.9% over the forecast period. By the end of 2024, the respiratory monitors segment is projected to reach US$ 435.0 Mn, expanding at a CAGR of 6.5% over the forecast period. By application, the cardiac arrhythmia segment is estimated to reach US$ 307.7 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.8% over the forecast period. The diabetes segment is projected to reach US$ 196.8 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 5.6% over the forecast period. By end user, the hospitals segment is anticipated to reach US$ 690.1 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.6% over the forecast period. The homecare settings segment is anticipated to reach US$ 347.3 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.2% over the forecast period.

Among regions, North America is estimated to dominate the global remote patient monitoring device market with 31.4% revenue share of the overall market by the end of 2016. The Europe remote patient monitoring device market is anticipated to reach US$ 341.1 Mn by 2024. By 2024, North America and Europe markets are expected to account for over four-fifth share of the global remote patient monitoring device market revenue.

Some key companies covered in the report include Boston Scientific Corporation, Koninklijke Philips N.V., Abbott Laboratories, Nihon Kohden Corporation, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., LifeWatch AG, Medtronic, and St. Jude Medical. These companies are primarily focused on enhancing their product portfolio through research and development initiatives and through the introduction of innovative technologies in order to gain higher market share and to strengthen their respective positions in the global market.

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Digital platforms in Continuity of care is the future of health

Digital platforms – As Australia’s healthcare system creaks under the strain of ageing baby boomers and a looming chronic disease crisis, digital solutions like telehealth, big data and the internet of things (IoT) are joining to drive more effective and affordable care, while helping to identify solutions to problems that are yet to even arise.

Australia’s healthcare digital system faces some daunting challenges over the coming years and decades.

With an ageing population and rising incidences of chronic disease, current healthcare resources and funding models are already buckling under the strain, demanding that policy makers and health professionals develop new ways of thinking and problem-solving.

According to Philips Australia and New Zealand managing director, Kevin Barrow the immediate challenge facing healthcare systems is how to develop proactive, rather than reactive, approaches to patient care.

Typically, the older people get the greater the chances they will require hospitalization when they are ill. This is one of the biggest cost burdens on Australia’s healthcare system, while the rising incidences of chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease across the board, put further pressure on the system.

Data from the US Department of Health and Human Services, and other sources, reveals that in developed countries, as little as three per cent of patients are deemed sufferers of chronic disease. Yet this group uses up to half the available healthcare resources.

This should come as a wake-up call for Australia’s healthcare industry, which has so far been slow to adapt, Barrow says. “Most of our healthcare digital systems haven’t changed in 100 years in terms of how healthcare is delivered.”

Many health facilities and organizations are still bogged down in proprietary legacy systems that can’t talk to each other.

For instance, there are several different imaging and health record systems in Australia, meaning that hospitals and clinicians waste time trying to access patients’ medical histories.

This helps to explain why the fax machine remains an essential – yet extremely wasteful – tool for hospitals and health professionals. Delegates to the recent Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) eHealth Forum in Melbourne, were told that some 1 billion pieces of paper are generated by Australia’s healthcare system each year.

Barrow says that often when patients are admitted to hospital, or visit a doctor, the issue is something that could have been dealt with without a physical consultation, if the right systems were in place.

Strong telehealth – or digital telemedicine platforms – allow patients and doctors to interact and engage remotely. Combined with robust, secure digital systems supporting easy access and sharing of patients’ health records, a picture begins to emerge of a more efficient, cost-effective system able to support true continuity of care.

In mid-2016, Philips published the Future Health Index (FHI), a comparative international study analyzing the readiness of healthcare operators around the world to meet the challenges of the future. Some 200 healthcare professionals, and 2,000 patients were surveyed in Australia.

All respondents revealed a strong desire for systems supporting better interaction and data sharing between doctors and patients. However, the survey also showed there’s quite a long way to go.

Most notably, almost three-quarters (70 per cent) of patients said they were having to repeat information about their health each time they visited a different health professional. Other data revealed frustrations around accessing health records, both for patients themselves and people trying to provide homecare to sick relatives.

As one of the world’s leading providers of healthcare innovation, Philips has been involved in a number of important initiatives helping chronic disease sufferers better manage themselves.

Mid-2016, Philips published the results of a three-year ‘self-supported care’ program involving almost 2,000 patients in UK city Liverpool living with chronic, or long-term conditions (LTCs) including diabetes, heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The trial sought to improve patient awareness and emotional well-being by combining innovative telemonitoring equipment with a ‘clinical hub’ and a program of case management, monitoring, education and coaching for patients with varying levels of long-term disease. The results included reductions in emergency admissions and secondary care costs ranging from 22 to 32 per cent.

In late 2014, Philips and US-provider Banner Health, commenced a six-month ‘at-home’ telehealth trial for patients with multiple chronic conditions, which saw a 45 per cent drop in hospitalizations, 32 per cent drop in acute and long-term care costs, and a 27 per cent reduction in the total cost of care.

“One of the key themes we see emerging in the sector is the needs of patients becoming increasingly linked with those of the clinician,” Barrow explains, adding that connected digital tools coupled with improved clinical capabilities are driving better collaboration and improved ways to manage health.

How big data will disrupt the future of digital healthcare

Healthcare is an extremely data-intensive industry, with no one expecting the deluge to abate anytime soon.

Added to the huge volumes of conventional patient information, such as x-rays, CT scans, pathology reports and the like, personal health records will increasingly contain genetic, proteomic, 3D and other complex data sets, in turn bringing the promise of personalized medicine closer to reality.

Massive shared, or ‘cloud’ computing grids are increasingly able to process and correlate these sorts of data sets with those charting family histories, as well as data on drug compounds, allowing clinicians to finely calibrate treatments in ways undreamt of five or 10 years ago.

As one of the leading innovators in the personalized health space, Philips is working with New York cancer specialists, WMC Health, to build a large-scale informatics platform designed to create individually-targeted oncology treatments based on each patients’ specific genome. The solution features Philips’ IntelliSpace Genomics Solution which will integrate large-scale genome analysis with large patient clinical data sets.

As big data technologies continue to improve, the possibilities for developing even deeper insights into the factors influencing human health and our environment appear vast.

For instance, healthcare organizations are now realizing the potential to correlate data on chronic or communicable disease with factors such as geography, climate and pollution, socio economic background, age, ethnicity and family history to develop more targeted, cost-effective and measurable healthcare solutions.

The huge amounts of data already being generated within digital healthcare are set to increase by orders of magnitude over the coming years as the expansion of the Internet of things (IoT) gathers pace, potentially linking billions and billions of electronic devices and sensors.

These digital devices and sensors will generate and share still more data, and with them will come more opportunities for discovery. New and emerging systems will add further impetus, morphing and adapting environments as they evolve.

As one of the world’s leading makers of high-end medical devices and solutions, Philips sees IoT as a critically important driver of healthcare innovation moving forward, with implications at the individual level as well as the macro level helping us develop a better understanding and better strategies to prepare for the healthcare challenges that lie ahead.

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Machine Learning – MIT professor’s quick primer on 2 types

By Mike Miliard

Machine learning – There are two main approaches – supervised and unsupervised – and each has specific applications in the context of healthcare.

And even though machine learning tools impact has not yet sent shockwaves through the industry, the potential of each is enormous, according to John Guttag, head of the Data Driven Inference Group at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

At its basic level, machine learning involves looking at data, and from that data finding information that is not readily visible. Example: Applying machine learning to data about patients infected with Zika or another virus and using what we can learn about what happens to those people to inform care decisions regarding the best ways to treat people who get infected in the future.

“Typically we use machine learning to build inference tools, where we find patterns in existing data that allow us – when presented with new data – to infer something interesting about that data,” said Guttag. “Machine learning is driven entirely by the data, rather than by, say, human intuition.”

Here’s a look at the two main types of machine learning and why they matter to healthcare.

Supervised machine learning
“In supervised machine learning, we’re given the data and some outcome associated with the data,” Guttag explained. “We’re given all the people who have Zika infections and then we know which of the women have children with birth defects and which don’t. And maybe from that we could build a model saying that if the woman is pregnant and has Zika, what’s the probability that her baby has a birth defect. And it might be different for 30 year old women than for 40 year old women. Who knows what the factors would be. But there we have a label – all sorts of details about the woman, and was the baby healthy or not. So that would be supervised learning: We have a label about the outcome of interest.”

Unsupervised machine learning
Unsupervised learning, on the other hand “means we wouldn’t have a label,” he said. “We just get data, and from that data we try to infer some hidden structure in the data. So for example you get a bunch of healthcare data and you find patients who look ‘similar.’ Typically the nice thing about unsupervised learning is you find things you weren’t even looking for. It’s also useful for when, for one reason or another, the data is impossible to label.”

The case for using emerging tech today
Guttag added that machine learning is among the fastest growing parts of computer science right now in the world. As healthcare entities continually ramp up their analytics and big data efforts and gird for precision medicine and population health, machine learning as well as artificial intelligence and cognitive computing are poised to become even more valuable.

While vendors such as IBM Watson, Google, Microsoft, and other tech giants are bringing new technologies to market, most of the progress made in machine learning is happening in financial services, retail and other industries, and has been for about a decade.

Healthcare, true to its reputation for slowly embracing new technologies, is a bit late to the party.

One of the challenges unique to healthcare is the long gap between when new knowledge is obtained and when clinicians and doctors can put it to use treating patients, which is among the reasons Guttag urged major healthcare providers to more aggressively integrate today’s machine learning tools into their workflows now.

“People should be using today’s technology to do things today,” Guttag said. “Machine learning is a huge deal. And we’re going to see some pretty dramatic changes over the next few years.”

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Continuous monitoring tools and Telehealth could save hospitals significant cost

Harvard researchers predict that contact-free continuous monitoring platforms have the potential to save the healthcare industry as much as $15 billion.  By Jeff Lagasse, August 04, 2016

Contact-free continuous monitoring, a platform that taps into sensors to measure patients vital signs and other metrics, hold the promise to save health systems $15 billion a year.

That’s according to a new peer-reviewed paper published in Critical Care Medicine.

CFCM is used to monitor heartbeat, respiratory rate, ulcers and patient motion. The technology’s components include sensors placed under a patient’s mattress or in a chair, bedside monitor, central display station and in handheld devices.

The sensors measure vibration and calculate motion, heartbeats per minute and breaths per minute, which detect any changes from regular patterns. If a patient’s status changes, the platform alerts nurses through large screens set up in conspicuous locations, as well as handheld devices.

Researchers from Harvard School of Medicine in a new Frost and Sullivan report entitled “Finding Top-Line Opportunities in a Bottom-Line Healthcare Market” claimed each hospital bed monitored with the EarlySense CFCM approach enables hospitals to achieve a cost savings nearing $20,000.

The cost savings are attributed to clinical outcome improvements published by hospitals implementing CFCM. Evidence suggests the technology can assist clinicians in earlier detection of patient deterioration, helping to reduce patient length of stay, minimize use of intensive care units, reduce falls and pressure ulcers and avoid cardiac and respiratory arrests.

The $15 billion figure was arrived at by extending the savings to all 750,000 relevant beds in the U.S. hospital system. The estimate does not take into account those patients in beds outside the hospital setting.

Clinical data also estimates that use of EarlySense has the annual potential to reduce patient falls by 301,809; reduce pressure ulcers by over 1 million; slash ICU days by about 1.7 million; eliminate more than 259,000 “Code Blue” events; and avoid close to 208,000 deaths.

“The healthcare industry is constantly working to improve efficiency,” said Charlie Whelan, Frost and Sullivan’s Transformational Health North America consulting director, in a statement. “These studies show that continuous monitoring presents a unique opportunity to create both top and bottom line benefits, while simultaneously improving quality of care.”

CEO Spotlight: American Well’s Roy Schoenberg on the U.S. coming out of a 10-year telehealth war zone

By Bill Siwicki, August 05, 2016

As providers, payers and patients align in what Schoenberg calls a national play for delivering real-time care anywhere patients and providers can connect, telemedicine stands ready to revolutionize healthcare the way Amazon has rewritten retail.

After a long decade of struggle, the stars have aligned for telemedicine, according to Roy Schoenberg, MD, CEO and co-founder of telehealth technology and services vendor American Well. And the understanding and acceptance of providers, payers and patients have united to the point where the electronic delivery of healthcare is poised to become part of the norm.

“First, medical authorities, policymakers, and healthcare’s movers and shakers have acknowledged that delivering healthcare through technology can be valuable and safe; that has been the war zone for the last 10 years of telehealth,” Schoenberg said. “Medical boards and medical associations were hesitant about embracing telehealth; physicians were concerned about diminishing the relationship they have with patients. But the experiences with telehealth during the last couple of years have been reassuring, and telehealth increasingly has become one of the ways physicians interact with patients.”

Second, insurance companies that while label American Well technology including Anthem, United Health Group and several of the big Blues have finally begun to take the stance that, like in any other industry, digital mechanisms are here to stay and will be a major part of the industry’s future; as a result, payers are getting on top of telehealth and discovering how to conduct such care safely, Schoenberg said.

“Payers are understanding that the efficiencies and even the humanitarian value of allowing healthcare to be delivered in this manner are overwhelming,” he added. “If you can shift healthcare via the internet to more private home care settings, for example, you not only are saving costs of emergency room visits and inpatient stays, you are changing how and when appropriate healthcare can be rendered. Telehealth, for instance, can have a very deep impact on how chronic patients are managed.”

And third, enough time has passed that telemedicine technology vendors have gained the experience – and learned lessons from mistakes – so that the vendors are completely capable of providing safe and comprehensive care via technology, Schoenberg said.

“Vendors have made corrections to the patient experience and physician usability, for example, and have learned how to foster intimacy in these kinds of healthcare encounters,” he explained. “Between the adoption of electronic delivery as a valid way of doing medicine, the payment structure, and all of the factors that affect the physician-patient experience, the stars have aligned to cause what we see today, which is a booming market.”

What’s more, telemedicine tools and practices are becoming more embedded into the routine delivery of care among providers that also white label American Well services such as Cleveland Clinic, Community Health System,  Intermountain, Miami Children’s Hospital, Providence Health System and others — even employers are getting into the act, such as clients Oracle and Honeywell.

So what are the next steps? Schoenberg points in two directions.

“From the patient standpoint, we will see very quickly the transition of telehealth from just the myopic quick urgent care example of finding a physician to prescribe antibiotics to something that envelops all of healthcare, especially patients who need serious longitudinal care and frequent interaction with physicians, which increasingly is tied into things like accountable care organizations,” Schoenberg said. “We will see telehealth serving as a part of the overall relationship with patients.”

Schoenberg said American Well today is seeing provider organization clients developing telehealth programs around things like heart disease and autism, and that this sort of care will become the prevailing way healthcare executives and providers think of telehealth.

“No longer just the mother with a child in a stormy night who needs to see a physician kind of stuff,” he added. “Telehealth for ongoing clinical relationships will become the avalanche of this technology.”

On the other end of the spectrum, at the national level, Schoenberg said another next step in the evolution of telemedicine will be the realization of benefits derived from the notion that healthcare can be extended through technology so that patients are no longer married to a facility.

“If we bring together organizations that represent demand for healthcare and allow them to electronically interact with care delivery organizations, then that will not be unlike what online retail has done to the retail industry – we will be able to expand on how healthcare is being rendered and where it is being made available,” Schoenberg concluded. “This is a national play for the delivery of real-time healthcare that is embraced by the provider and the payer brands that will be available wherever the internet goes. That is how Amazon has rewritten the retail industry.”

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Digital health tools ‘dramatically transforming’ care experience

Digital health tools: a new study found that patients of all ages, with Baby Boomers leading the charge, are interested in accessing medical records online and tapping into portals to book appointment, pay bills, and refill prescriptions.

By Jack McCarthy

Nearly 75 percent of patients expressed a high level of interest in accessing their electronic medical records via digital tools, according to new research, and 33 percent indicated that EHRs have already changed their experience for the better.

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allegro pediatrics

Supporting a mobile healthcare workforce

Allegro Pediatrics has been able to support its mobile workforce by expanding its Citrix IT infrastructure. The expansion has increased the performance, speed, stability and scalability of the delivery of its EHR and apps to its clinicians. The 90 physicians who work for Allegro Pediatrics are a mobile group, moving to and from its eight clinics and local hospitals in the Bellevue, Washington, area. The need for physicians to be able to access patient data anywhere or any time was the driver for providing mobility solutions, according to CIO Brock Morris. And a mobile environment such as this one requires a robust IT infrastructure to support both physicians and an IT team.

In 2009, when Allegro Pediatrics first implemented its electronic health record (EHR) system, Morris’s team decided to expand its Citrix deployment, which is now comprised of Citrix NetScaler, XenApp and XenServer. The goal was to securely deliver the EHR and other applications to the end user with performance, speed, stability and scalability in mind. The IT team leverages Citrix NetScaler to manage its user load across all of its XenApp servers and its EHR application servers.

Allegro Pediatrics outfitted its physicians with laptops and tablets, rather than deploying workstations in the exam rooms. With physicians seeing 250,000 patients a year –1,400 patients on a busy day – performance and speed are critical. Physicians complete rounds at three of the local hospitals and also Seattle Children’s Hospital for newborns. “With their mobile devices, they are able to access EHRs remotely when they are on-call at home, and even when they are away on vacation,” he explained. “They can pull up a patient’s chart wherever they are.”

With eight clinics, physician shortages often occur. Armed with the devices that they’re comfortable with, physicians can easily move from one clinic to another without having to become familiar with specific devices in any particular clinic. This seamless experience and accessibility to patient data has led to higher physician satisfaction, according to Morris.

One of the most important benefits of having a Citrix-based infrastructure is the fact that no patient data resides on devices. Instead, data remains in the data center. “If the devices are lost, retired or stolen, we can remotely disable them to ensure the safety of protected health information,” says Morris.

Allegro Pediatrics has also garnered business benefits. Now physicians are able to fill out billing forms online when they visit newborns in the hospital – a task that previously was often completed after the fact. Bills are sent out in a timely manner and accounts receivable is collecting payments sooner than ever before.

In addition, the IT department is benefiting from the infrastructure. In one day, Morris and his team recently rolled out 110 tablets pre-loaded with Windows 10 to medical assistants across its landscape of clinics. The medical assistants were able to power-on the devices, and with little training, they were able to log onto the Citrix storefront, access applications and start their regular tasks that morning. “We had a seamless migration to Windows 10. Despite provisioning brand new devices and operating systems, the Citrix platform enabled all end users to have the same consistent experience,” he said. The IT department received few calls the day after deployment. Morris concluded, “It is the most successful migration that we have ever performed in our organization.”

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google harvard symptom patient monitoring

Google partners with Harvard Medical School, Mayo Clinic for symptom search

Google, the world’s most used search engine, is partnering with two of the world’s leading health organizations to take the confusion out of symptom searching.

“We worked with a team of medical doctors to carefully review the individual symptom information, and experts at Harvard Medical School and Mayo Clinic evaluated related conditions for a representative sample of searches to help improve the lists we show,” Veronica Pinchin, a product manager on Google’s search team, writes in a blog post introducing Google’s new offering.

“Before symptom search, you really had to know the exact name of what you were looking for to find the best health information,” Pinchin adds. “It was difficult to stumble on the right condition. Health content on the web can be difficult to navigate, and tends to lead people from mild symptoms to scary and unlikely conditions, which can cause unnecessary anxiety and stress.”

About 1 percent of Google’s search queries worldwide are related to medical symptoms. That seems small, but it translates into millions of searches, she notes.

In consultation with Harvard Medical School and the Mayo Clinic, Google has built millions of digital cards for millions of searches.

“Because this is an algorithm, it isn’t perfect,” Pinchin writes. “But we’re going to expand and improve it over time.”

Symptom search is currently available only in the U.S. – and only in English – in Google iOS and Android apps, and in Google.com search results on mobile phones and tablets.

But Google plans to make searches available via desktop browsers and to international markets in more languages, but the company has not indicated when.

In her blog, Pinchin offers some cautionary words: “Symptom search (like all medical information on Google) is intended for informational purposes only, and you should always consult a doctor for medical advice.”

Twitter: @Bernie_HITN
Email the writer: bernie.monegain@himssmedia.com

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Mobility Aids is anticipated to reach 7.8 billions

Mobility Aids & Transportation Equipment Market is Anticipated to reach 7.8 Billion USD by 2021

Increasing ageing population and new betterment in the Healthcare Industry is driving the Mobility Aids and Transportation Equipment Market to $7.8 Billion by 2021.

Report Market Analysis: By Type (Wheelchairs, Walking Aids, Mobility Scooters, Stair Lifts); By Age Group (Children, Elderly); By User (Hospital, Clinics, Patients)- Forecast (2016-2021)”, published by IndustryARC, estimates the market to reach $7.8 Billion by 2021.

Mobility Aids and Transportation Equipment are used by individuals with any kind of physical disability to assist them in mobility. They are also used in hospitals and clinics for shifting patents from one room to another. Intensive R&D in the field of medical devices and equipment has led to the invention of products that have enhanced the quality of life of the disabled people.  These aids and equipment comprise of wheelchairs, walking aids, mobility scooters and stairlifts among many others.

Avail a Sample Market Brochure @ http://www.industryarc.com/pdfdownload.php?id=7378

According a recent study of IndustryARC the global market value for Mobility Aids and Transportation Equipment Market is estimated to reach $7.8 Billion by 2021. The manual wheelchairs segment will be the highest revenue generating segment in this market. The fastest growing segment will be motorized wheelchairs. The combined revenue for these two segments accounted for approximately 68% of the total revenue in 2015. Walking aids such as canes, crutches and walkers among many others also contributed a significant share to the total revenue.

Mobility Equipment for elderly disabled people and seniors comprises of a large number of assistive, rehabilitative and adaptive devices as well as disability products. The increasing number of bone and knee disorders as well as the disabilities and diseases such as Stroke and osteoarthritis lead to the rising demand of the mobility equipment across the elderly people and the seniors. These assistive tools such as wheelchairs and power chairs help in performing activities and tasks with greater ease and freedom in case of a difficulty or an injury.

Americas region was the market leader in 2015 with nearly 55% of the total market and is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 3.2% through 2016 to 2021. However APAC region will have the highest growth rate in the forecast period. Americas will continue to be the market leader in 2021 also.

The Major Players in this Market Include:

  • Sunrise Medicals GMBH & Co. (Germany)
  • Invacare Corporation (U.S.)
  • Stryker Corporation (U.S.)
  • Medline Industries Inc. (U.S.)
  • Drive Medicals (U.S.)

The major manufacturers in this market have utilized product launches, product developments and acquisitions to expand entry into interconnected markets and enhance core competencies through additions to product portfolio as well as improving the existing product line. The acquisitions help them to reduce competition and enter into new markets.

The report mobility aids and transportation equipment provides detailed analysis of different types of mobility aids and their end users. The various mobility aids and transportation equipment products incorporated in the study include-

  • Manual Wheelchairs
  • Electrically Powered Wheelchairs/Motorized Wheelchairs
  • Walking Aids
  • Mobility Scooters
  • Stairlifts

The overall market is also presented from the perspective of different geographic regions and the key countries for this industry. Competitive landscape for each of the product types is highlighted and market players are profiled.

Related Reports of Your Interest:

Healthcare Transportation Services Market – Healthcare Transportation Services Market Analysis: By Medical Transportation Type (Incubator, Pharmaceuticals, Mobile Treatment, Patient Transport); By Non-Medical (Repatriation Services, Courier, Mailroom Services) – Forecast (2015 – 2020)

http://industryarc.com/Report/5341/Healthcare-Transportation-Services-Market-Research-Report.html

Home Healthcare Market – Home Healthcare Market (2013 – 2018) – By Products (Dialysis, Diabetes, Drug Delivery, Essential, Mobility, Respiratory & Others); Services (Rehabilitation, Skilled, Unskilled, Virtual, Hospice, Companion, Social & Others)

http://industryarc.com/Report/102/home-healthcare-products-services-equipment-market.html

About IndustryARC:

IndustryARC is a Research and consulting firm that publishes more than 500 Reports Annually in various industries, such as Agriculture, Automotive, Automation & Instrumentation, Chemicals and Materials, Energy and Power, Electronics, Food & Beverages, Information Technology, Life sciences & Healthcare.

IndustryARC primarily focuses on Cutting Edge Technologies and Newer Applications of the Market. Our Custom Research Services are designed to provide insights on the constant flux in the global demand-supply gap of markets. Our strong analyst team enables us to meet the client research needs at a very quick speed with a variety of options for your business.

Media Contact
Company Name: IndustryARC

Contact Person: Mr. Sanjay Matthews

Phone: 1-614-588-8538 (Ext: 101)

Country: United States

Website: Industryarc.com

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June 8, 2016 / Posted by / Mobility Aids is anticipated to reach 7.8 billions