Questions? Feedback? powered by Olark live chat software Patient Archives - eMedics.org

Welcome to eMEDICS.org! your IT partner for Patient Management

Opening Hours : Monday to Friday - 9am to 5pm
  Contact : +33.6.95.06.31.17

All Posts Tagged: Patient

google harvard symptom patient monitoring

Monitoring Device Market Worth US$ 1,502.9 Mn by 2024

Global remote patient monitoring device market is expected to expand at a CAGR of 6.7% and is estimated to reach US$ 1,502.9 Mn by 2024, creating incremental opportunity of US$ 657.1 Mn between 2016 and 2024. Persistence Market Research analyzes the overall performance of the global remote patient monitoring device market and provides key insights on the factors and trends likely to influence the market during this eight-year period.

Rising prevalence of cardio vascular diseases, respiratory disorders, and diabetes in the general population are major factors driving the growth of the global remote patient monitoring device market. Increasing healthcare expenditure and increasing availability of effective treatment solutions for chronic diseases is also projected to boost revenue growth of the global remote patient monitoring device market. Other factors boosting market growth include an increasing awareness among people to self-monitor before disease advancement and government reimbursement issued on homecare settings facilities.

Lack of trained professionals to help with remote patient monitoring devices is expected to hinder market growth of the global remote patient monitoring device market. Insufficiency in maintaining the privacy and security of the stored data, lack of uniformity in device functionality, and lack of general awareness on patient monitoring devices are the key restraints challenging the market.

Global remote patient monitoring device market is segmented on the basis of Product Type (Cardiac Monitors, Respiratory Monitors, Hematological Monitors), Application (Cardiac Arrhythmia, Diabetes, Ischemic diseases, Hypertension, Sleep apnea, Chronic respiratory diseases, Hyperlipidemia), End User (Hospitals, Homecare Settings, Long-term Care Centers, Others), and Region (North America, Latin America, Europe, APEJ, and MEA).

By product type, the cardiac monitors segment is expected to remain the largest segment and is anticipated to reach US$ 765.4 Mn by the end of 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.9% over the forecast period. By the end of 2024, the respiratory monitors segment is projected to reach US$ 435.0 Mn, expanding at a CAGR of 6.5% over the forecast period. By application, the cardiac arrhythmia segment is estimated to reach US$ 307.7 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.8% over the forecast period. The diabetes segment is projected to reach US$ 196.8 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 5.6% over the forecast period. By end user, the hospitals segment is anticipated to reach US$ 690.1 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.6% over the forecast period. The homecare settings segment is anticipated to reach US$ 347.3 Mn by 2024, expanding at a CAGR of 6.2% over the forecast period.

Among regions, North America is estimated to dominate the global remote patient monitoring device market with 31.4% revenue share of the overall market by the end of 2016. The Europe remote patient monitoring device market is anticipated to reach US$ 341.1 Mn by 2024. By 2024, North America and Europe markets are expected to account for over four-fifth share of the global remote patient monitoring device market revenue.

Some key companies covered in the report include Boston Scientific Corporation, Koninklijke Philips N.V., Abbott Laboratories, Nihon Kohden Corporation, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., LifeWatch AG, Medtronic, and St. Jude Medical. These companies are primarily focused on enhancing their product portfolio through research and development initiatives and through the introduction of innovative technologies in order to gain higher market share and to strengthen their respective positions in the global market.

Read More

Digital health tools ‘dramatically transforming’ care experience

Digital health tools: a new study found that patients of all ages, with Baby Boomers leading the charge, are interested in accessing medical records online and tapping into portals to book appointment, pay bills, and refill prescriptions.

By Jack McCarthy

Nearly 75 percent of patients expressed a high level of interest in accessing their electronic medical records via digital tools, according to new research, and 33 percent indicated that EHRs have already changed their experience for the better.

Read More
telehealth, mobile,cloud

Mobile and Cloud capabilities are driving change

Mobile and Cloud among top EHR trends to watch in 2016, consultant says, By Jessica Davis, Associate Editor

Mobile and Cloud solutions in the market for electronic health records, is predicted to be worth about $35.2 billion by 2019, the steady rise of data has increased the need to strengthen the software to make data more accessible, reduce errors and increase the ease of use.

“You have two driving forces – demand and technological capabilities,” Cathy Reisenwitz, a researcher with software firm Capterra, told Healthcare IT News.

For many years, EHRs have been “aimed at satisfying regulators, not just what clinicians want or need,” she said. That’s changing, though, as developers work more to make health records more appealing to end users on both sides of the doctor/patient relationship. Better mobile interfaces, for instance, are “clearly desired by patients and physicians.”

Reisenwitz laid out four EHR and other health IT trends the industry can expect to see in 2016.

1. EHRs are moving toward the cloud. Start-up costs for EHRs can prove burdensome for some institutions, while cloud-based tools offer minimal start-up costs and can make better use of providers’ current resources. The cloud also enables better continuity of care and easier software updates. In the coming year, more and more EHRs will offer cloud services.

2. EHRs will improve the patient portal experience. Though patient portal usage got off to a slow start, it’s been steadily gaining momentum. More providers will both offer and promote patient portals. Some may even have patients use the portals during office visits to begin getting their data into the system. And patients will start to see their value.

3. Telemedicine will finally find its stride. The telemedicine market is forecasted to exceed $30 billion in the next five years, as providers increasingly see the need to reach seniors and patients in rural areas. The mass adoption of wearables will promote telemedicine, as well, especially when patients are willing to share device data with providers.

4. EHRs are going mobile. More and more providers want to provide medical care from their smartphones, and more patients want to access data through mobile devices. To accommodate this need, EHRs will will offer better mobile design and functionality. Scheduling and patient chart updates will align with prescribing functions on mobile devices, as well.

Providers will need to overcome some hurdles for these trends to take hold, Reisenwitz said, noting that, at the moment, “there’s a huge space where the data isn’t able to be fully utilized, as it’s unstructured or poorly structured; therefore not easily accessed nor interoperable.”

The other big EHR challenge is cybersecurity, she added, stoking fears that are preventing even wider acceptance of mobile and cloud platforms.

Read More

Forbes – A Startup Poised To Disrupt In-Home Senior Care

The stark reality is that we will all grow old at some point.

The years have a way of catching up with us–and when they do, we generally have one common wish: to live out our years in our existing homes in a safe and comfortable manner.

But finding a qualified caregiver for our loved ones, if we are unable to care for them, may be the most difficult part of realizing that wish.

The statistics are daunting when it comes to home care for older persons. There are some 55 million adults taking care of their parents, with over 2 million caregivers.

And close to 92% of adults when surveyed would rather live in their own home as opposed to a nursing home. The fact is that in a large percentage of cases, family members have difficulty caring for a senior relative, so searching for a caregiver is a necessity.

While there are tens of thousands of agencies across the country that can match you with a caregiver, there is no customization of the process, and you have no way of seeing what’s going on when you are not home.
unnamed

Programming since the age of 12, the computer engineer-turned-entrepreneur migrated to Silicon Valley working at Yahoo YHOO +0.00%, then transitioned to Bain Ventures.

After he and his family struggled to find a caregiver for his 93-year old grandfather who was previously living independently, Bruno decided to quit his job at Bain Ventures to start a company that would make it easier for families to locate and hire qualified caregivers.

“If you asked me four years ago what I would be doing now, there was no way I would have guessed that I would be working in aging—but these things all happen through personal experience,” said Bruno.

Bruno did some research, and after contacting and volunteering at several dozen homecare agencies, he realized what a huge need — and opportunity — exists in the $80 billion in-home senior care market, which today has a poorly organized workforce and a customer base often with chronic medical illnesses who may not receive the best possible care.

Bruno’s personal journey to find the best possible care for his grandfather uncovered myriad issues ranging from lack of coordinated training for caregivers to a feeling of emotional detachment that emanated in the quality and approach to geriatric care, he explained.

Without the proper tools for the families, and without the support from the caregivers themselves, there had to be another answer to providing high quality home care for seniors.

Bruno kept asking himself why the homecare industry was in such disarray, and by volunteering at several agencies, he became convinced that there was a more efficient way to improve delivery by using technology to power the change.

“We have focused on building a technology platform that supports caregivers and empowers them to do the best job possible, at the same time creating transparency for families so they can see what’s happening real-time in the home,” explains Bruno. “It also creates a very reliable service which demonstrates that we will do the work that requires older adults to be happy.”

Bruno’s core philosophy and company’s mission is simple: “Every older adult deserves a beautiful day.”

So, Bruno assembled a team of other like-minded 20-somethings, including Harry Heymann, who designed the architecture and wrote the backend code for Four Square, considered a pioneer of consumer mobile applications.

Hometeam, launched in 2013, is based in New York City, but also has clients in New Jersey and Philadelphia. The company plans to expand into nine more states within the next year. The company raised $11 million last year from Lux Capital, IA Ventures and Recruit Strategic Partners.

The company has already sent more than 250 caregivers into hundreds of homes throughout New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania.

The caregivers are made to feel part of a team, and are given employee status with health insurance and workers comp benefits, as opposed to being independent contractors or considered part-time workers. They are also compensated 30-50% more than a typical caregiver hired by a standard agency in current markets. While typical wages for a standard caregiver hover around $9-$10 per hour, Hometeam’s wages are closer to $15 per hour. Clients are charged from $20-$27 per hour.

The company’s mission is to transform the in-home care and aging experience by providing elderly clients with personalized care planning, expert caregiver matching, custom mobile technology, and proactive case management to improve older adults’ health and well-being while giving their families peace of mind.

Using technology to improve in-home care has other competitors currently in the marketplace. Among the notables, Honor, founded by Seth Sternberg, formerly of Google GOOGL -0.77%, launched earlier this year in the San Francisco Bay Area, and had raised 20 million by April of 2015. Touting itself as a technological solution to in-home care, its impressive line-up of supporters include Marc Andreessen, as well as Jeremy Stoppleman, CEO of Yelp. Its caregivers are not employees, but independent contractors.

CareZapp, a UK start-up in 2014, prides itself on its technological wizardry leading to more holistic care, allowing patients to communicate with other patients as well as doctors and family members. The app can also interface with other smart in-home technologies including motion sensors that can track movements and alert family members when there are aberrations.

 

The Hometeam Solution

Hometeam sets itself apart from its competitors by developing its own software that intelligently matches families with experienced caregivers, connects families to their loved ones through the use of mobile technology in the home, and helps caregivers plan days that improve the quality of life of older adults.

Hometeam also distinguishes itself is by having its caregivers identify activities which every patient prefers–something that can be challenging when a person has physical limitations which impair movement and mobility.
Hometeam iPad mood-3

The core foundation of technology for Hometown begins with an iPad for each home that is used by the caregiver to send texts, pictures, and update family members about any changes in medical conditions.

“I want older adults to live more comfortably and happily in their own homes,” said Bruno. “I want to imagine what a perfect day looks like for each of our clients and make it come alive with a combination of great mobile technology and the best caregiving team possible.”

The broader picture, however, may become the integration of technology-enabled apps that also can monitor key parameters of health such as blood pressure, heart rate, medication compliance, and ideally dispatch and communicate with a medical provider when there are aberrations in patterns of vital signs.

“America will face a tremendous challenge in caring for our senior citizens,” said Rich Able, Founder of X2 Biosystems and Partner, Stratos Group Seattle. ”It will be imperative to implement ‘The Connected Senior Citizen’.”

Family members, clinicians, and assisted care providers will need a new generation of technology platforms to help them stay informed, coordinated, and most importantly, connected,” added Able.

“Aging in place and staying in one’s own home environment is highly desirable to most senior citizens,” emphasizes Able, so in order to accomplish this goal, equipping the home with the most useful technology will become critical in the next few decades.

“Startups in the ‘Connected Senior’ vertical must develop meaningful biometric wearables that provide familty members, caregivers, and clinicians the information necessary to attenuate the need for costly emergency care, hospital stays, and multiple physician visits,” he added.

Bruno explains that his company is actively seeking partners to accomplish these higher level functions to advance the concept of such a “connected senior home.”

Read More

OIG to CMS: Make EHR fraud prevention efforts a priority

[HealthCare IT News] The Office of Inspector General is once again calling out CMS for failing to adequately address fraud vulnerabilities in electronic health records. Despite submitting recommendations back in 2013, a new OIG report underscored that the agency is still dragging its feet with implementing EHR fraud safeguards.

Part of the Office of Inspector General’s role is to audit and evaluate HHS processes and procedures and put forth recommendations based on deficiencies or abuses identified. Turns out, a lot of these recommendations are ignored, disagreed upon or unimplemented, according to OIG’s new Compendium of Unimplemented Recommendations report. And EHR fraud is on that list.

“HHS must do more to ensure that all hospitals’ EHRs contain safeguards and that hospitals use them to protect against electronically enabled healthcare fraud,” OIG officials wrote in the report.

Specifically, audit logs should actually be operational when an EHR is available. And CMS should also develop concrete guidelines around the use of copy-and-paste functions in an electronic health record. According to OIG data, most hospitals using EHRs had RTI International audit functions in place, but they were significantly underutilized. What’s more, only some 25 percent of hospitals even had policies in place regarding copy-and-paste functions.

These recommendations have come up repeatedly in recent OIG reports, and despite CMS officials agreeing with the outlined recommendations, the agency is still not making it enough of a priority.

In a January 2014 report, OIG also called out CMS for failing to make EHR fraud a priority. Specifically, OIG said, the CMS neglected to provide adequate guidance to its contractors tasked with identifying said EHR fraud, citing the fact that the majority of these contractors reviewed paper records in the same manner they reviewed EHRs, disregarding the differences. Moreover, only three out of 18 Medicare contractors were found to have used EHR audit data in their review process.

When it came to identifying copy-and-paste usage or over documentation, many contractors reported they were unable to do so. Considering some 74 percent to 90 percent of physicians use the copy/paste feature daily, according to a recent AHIMA report, the implications are significant.

As Diana Warner, director of HIM practice excellence at AHIMA, recounted back at the October 2013 MGMA conference, that dueto copy-and-paste usage, they had a patient at her previous medical practice who went from having a family history of breast cancer to having a history of breast cancer. The error was caught by the insurance company, which thought the patient had lied, was poised to change her healthcare coverage. “We had to work for months to get that cleared up with the insurance company so her coverage would not be dropped,” Warner said. “We had to then find all the records that it got copy and pasted into” incorrectly and then track down the locations the data was sent to.

Read More
icon form health care hospital

Patient Home Care Monitoring Will Revolutionize the Health sector in 2016

Real-time health care monitoring including the patient’s home continues to gain importance as pressures come from a variety of sources to reduce risks and costs of readmissions and hospitalizations.

The Centers for the Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), enforcing the 2012 Medicare Readmission Reduction Program, the States and managed organizations have to deal with tighter budgets, rising costs of service, and stricter capitation rates.

Until recently, homecare reporting was archaic at best. The home was a “black box” where no information was generated when a home aide entered the residence and closed the door. Well-intentioned aides and nurses visited a patient’s home, administered and documented their visit in piles of paperwork that were often not reviewed or actionable.

Data input was first “modernized” to record home aide hours and minimal data about care by telephone. Such systems are used primarily for time and attendance. Aides visit the patient’s homes and use the patient’s home phone to document that their work shift has started. When the shift ends (and only when the shift is over), the home aide dials the phone to report the end of their shift, and with all the limitations inherent in pressing numbers on a dial pad, report that they had administered a few elements of care. Since they cannot see the output of what they entered, such data entry is error prone and of limited value.

To move home health care forward and to reduce costs requires a new approach. Forward thinking home aide agencies, health care providers, managed care organizations and hospitals are looking for innovative solutions that leverage the proliferation of tablets, smartphones and the ubiquitous Cloud to improve care at home, where patients spend most of their lives and where so many significant health events occur.

Thanks to technology, the “black box” of healthcare monitoring can be transformed into a sea of data where home health aides can gather 500-1,000 data points per month. The real-time collection and utilization of data from the home will offer these ten key benefits for specific patient populations, their families and every member of the patient’s care team in 2016.

Read More
December 2, 2015 / Posted by / Patient Home Care Monitoring Will Revolutionize the Health sector in 2016